Public Feedback Wanted in City of Toronto Survey

Posted on February 23, 2017

The City of Toronto is requesting input from residents and other members of the public through an online survey that will help determine how and when the City makes information available in languages other than English.

The survey will be available until March 10 at http://www.toronto.ca/languagesurvey and is offered in several languages including English, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Tamil, Tagalog, Italian, Portuguese, Farsi, Russian, Urdu, Korean and French.

This feedback is being sought as a part of the City’s review of the Multilingual Services Policy to ensure it continues to meet the needs of Toronto’s diverse communities. Toronto’s Multilingual Services Policy includes criteria for translating information into other languages to make sure information reaches residents, keeps them informed and engaged, and that City resources for translation and interpretation are used effectively. The policy is available at http://bit.ly/2l1dt99.

City of Toronto Issues its 2017 Interim Property Tax Bills

Posted on February 13, 2017

The City of Toronto has mailed 2017 interim property tax bills to property owners – the first of two regular tax bills that will be mailed this year. The 2017 final tax bill will be mailed in May.

Payment due dates for the interim tax bills under the regular three-instalment plan are March 1, April 3 and May 1. There are several ways to pay a property tax bill, including:

  • At banks or financial institutions through internet banking, telephone banking, automatic teller or in person. If paying tax bills by automatic teller, telephone or internet banking, customers should pay early to ensure payment reaches the City’s office by the due date.
  • By cheque using the business reply envelope included with the interim tax bill.
  • In person at the inquiry and cashier counters at Toronto City Hall or any civic centre from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday. Extended hours of 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. will be offered from February 27 to March 1.

Counter locations:
Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.
East York Civic Centre, 850 Coxwell Ave.
Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall
North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge St.
Scarborough Civic Centre, 150 Borough Dr.
York Civic Centre, 2700 Eglinton Ave. W.

Pre-authorized payments

The Pre-Authorized Tax Payment (PTP) Program allows residents to pay their taxes in two, six, or 11 pre-authorized automatic instalments. Residents can enrol in this program at any time if their taxes are in good standing. Applications for the PTP program are available at http://www.toronto.ca/propertytax.

The following interim bill withdrawal dates apply to customers who enrolled in the PTP program by January 25, 2017:

  • two-instalment plan: March 1
  • six-instalment plan: March 1, April 3 and May 1
  • 11-instalment plan: February 15, March 15, April 18, May 15, June 15

Property tax inquiries

For general information on property tax bills, customers can call the 311 Tax and Utility Inquiry Line. Customers within the city limits can call 311 and talk to a customer service representative about their property tax bill between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday to Friday. Customers outside Toronto’s city limits can call 416-392-CITY (2489). TTY users can call 416-392-0719 for assistance. Customers should have their tax roll number available when calling.

Property tax lookup

Customers can view their property tax account details anytime, anywhere, from a computer or mobile device using Property Tax Account Lookup at http://www.toronto.ca/revenueservices.

Ownership changes

Property owners who have recently purchased a property and who pay their property taxes through the PTP program or through their banking or financial institution must change their account information with the City or with their financial institution to avoid incurring fees resulting from misdirected payments.

Electronic billing

Residents can sign up at https://www.epost.ca to receive their property tax bills through epost, the digital mailbox from Canada Post that makes it easy to receive, manage and store bills online. epost™ is a trademark of Canada Post Corporation.

Assessment appeals

In 2016, every property owner in Ontario received a 2016 Property Assessment Notice from the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (MPAC) with the updated assessed value of their property as of January 1, 2016 for the 2017-2020 property tax years. Increases in the assessed value of a property will be phased in over four years (2017-2020). Decreases in assessed value will be fully implemented in 2017.

If property owners disagree with the assessed value, they can contact MPAC for assistance. Recent legislative changes to the Request for Reconsideration (RfR) process allow property owners 120 days from the issue date on their 2016 Property Assessment Notice to submit an RfR. For the majority of residential properties, this deadline occurred in 2016. If an RfR is filed in 2017, it will apply to the 2018 property tax year. You can visit http://www.aboutmyproperty.ca or http://www.mpac.ca for more information.

More information about property tax bills is available at http://www.toronto.ca/propertytax.

King Street Pilot Project Community Meeting

Posted on January 31, 2017

Friends,

On February 13th, 2017, City Planning will be holding the first of many public consultations on the King Street Pilot Project. The Study will explore a range of pilot options that recognize the different neighbourhood contexts along the 6km corridor from Dufferin Street in the west to River Street in the east. You can find information about this project at www.toronto.ca/kingstreetpilot.

King Street is the busiest surface transit route in the entire City, carrying more than 65,000 riders on a typical weekday. City Planning and TTC recognize that King Street isn’t working well. Streetcars are often stuck in mixed traffic, making it challenging to keep transit service running smoothly. This often results in bunching and gapping (time between streetcars), uneven utilization of capacity, and overcrowded TTC vehicles. During rush hour people are often unable to board the first streetcar that arrives.

King Street is also an important Downtown east-west spine, connecting many neighbourhoods with the largest concentration of jobs in the City, Region, and entire Country. The King Street corridor will continue to see significant population and employment growth in the coming decades, leading to further demand on these already heavily congested transit routes.

The City and TTC have recently been making operational changes to improve streetcar service including: allowing all-door loading (to become more effective with the new low-floor streetcars), adding supplemental buses, extending turning and on-street parking restrictions, optimizing transit stop locations and route running times, adding route supervisors, and improving night service.

But a more significant change is needed to improve transit service on King Street. The pilot project(s) will test a range of options to determine what might further improve transit reliability, capacity, and efficiency.

Pilot projects are an efficient and cost-effective way for cities to quickly test out new ideas in order to learn important lessons about what works and what doesn’t. The City has used pilot projects on a number of other projects, most notably the Bloor Cycling Pilot and the Richmond-Adelaide Cycle Tracks.

You are invited to join in the conversation. The first public consultation is being held on:

Monday, February 13th, 2017
6:30 PM to 9 pm
Metro Hall, Room 308/309
55 John Street South east corner of King Street West and John Street

You can also join the conversation online at kingstreetpilot@toronto.ca. If you would like to review the project details and join the mailing list visit www.toronto.ca/kingstreetpilot. Of course, you can also email me at councillor_perks@toronto.ca for more information.

I look forward to seeing you at the first public consultation on February 13th.

Gord

Free Tree Planting by the City

Posted on January 30, 2017

I would like everyone to be aware of the excellent program from Urban Forestry that allows a property owner to submit a tree planting request for the portion of land between roadways and private property, known as the public road allowance, in front of their home or business.

Urban Forestry plants and maintains trees on this land to help grow Toronto’s urban forest and to reach the City’s goal of increasing the tree canopy to 40 per cent.

Order your own tree for the next planting season here!

Youth In Policing Initiative (YIPI)

Posted on January 19, 2017

On February 14, 2006, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) announced that the Ontario Government would be funding various youth opportunity initiatives, as part of the government’s new strategy to address the growing needs of our youth. Part of that strategy, was and is a partnership with the Toronto Police Services Board, the Toronto Police Service, and the Ministry of Children and Youth Services to hire 150 youth for the summer.

Find more information about this exciting opportunity here: http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/yipi/

Do You Want to Make a Difference in your City?

Posted on December 20, 2016

Toronto residents are needed to serve on a range of City boards and committees. Board members provide oversight of their agency or corporation, bring a community perspective to board discussions, and help to reflect the needs and interests of Torontonians.

This fall, the City of Toronto will be recruiting for more than 70 public member positions across 20 boards. Bring your skills and experience to the table. To learn more about these opportunities and apply online, visit www.toronto.ca/ServeYourCity.

Sign up for the public appointments e-updates to receive information about application deadlines, vacancies, and new opportunities to join a City board by visiting: http://bit.ly/1BJj7iF.

City of Toronto’s Holiday Activities and Services

Posted on December 20, 2016

The City of Toronto encourages residents and visitors to take advantage of City programs and attractions offered during the year-end holiday period. Most City of Toronto operations and all municipal offices will be closed on Monday, December 26 and Tuesday, December 27, as well as Monday, January 2. City services that regularly operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week such as 311 Toronto and emergency services will be available. Information about curbside waste collection is provided later in this news release.

City Archives at 255 Spadina Rd., normally open on Saturday, will be closed on December 24 and 31 (Saturdays), as well as on the dates noted above for municipal offices in general.

Winter outdoor activities: Winter has arrived at Toronto’s parks, community centres and natural environments. More information about winter activities is available at http://www.toronto.ca/winter (“Welcome TO Winter Toronto”).

Fitness, camps and recreation programs: The City offers fitness classes, weight rooms, camps and more, offering something for everyone. Community recreation centres will be open until 4 p.m. on December 24 and 31 (later for those with scheduled permits) and closed on December 25 and 26 and January 1. Some facilities may be closed during the holiday period for annual maintenance. More information and schedules are available at http://www.toronto.ca/rec or by calling 311.

Swimming: Drop-in swim programs at pools across the city make it convenient to “make a splash” this holiday season. Schedules vary by location and are available at http://www.toronto.ca/swim.

Skating: The City offers a variety of free, leisure ice-skating programs for all ages and abilities at indoor arenas and outdoor rinks. Outdoor rinks that are open may be unsupervised. Indoor arenas will be closed on December 25 and 26 and January 1. Schedules vary by location. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/skate.

Skiing/snowboarding: The City operates two ski/snowboard centres. Earl Bales Ski and Snowboard Centre will be closed on December 25. Centennial Park Ski and Snowboard Centre has not yet opened for the season. For updates and schedules: http://www.toronto.ca/ski.

Riverdale Farm: The City’s Riverdale Farm is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/parks/featured-parks or by calling 416-392-6794.

High Park Zoo: The High Park Zoo is home to domestic and exotic animals, including Toronto’s famous capybaras Bonnie and Clyde, and is open daily from dawn to dusk. Admission to the zoo is free. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/parks/zoo/.

Flower shows: Christmas flower shows at the City’s Allan Gardens and Centennial Park conservatories are a tradition during the holiday season. The flower shows are open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. until January 8 and admission is free. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/conservatories/.

Playground at Flemingdon Park: Playground Paradise at the Flemingdon Park Community Centre offers fun for children ages 12 years and younger. The fee is $2.50 per child for two hours. Holiday hours are available at http://bit.ly/1aZjJ4T or by calling 416-395-6014. The regular schedule resumes on January 7.

Toronto Zoo

The Toronto Zoo will be open throughout the holiday period except on December 25. More information is available at http://www.torontozoo.com/.

Historic Sites 

Eight of the City’s historic sites are offering holiday-themed events and tours for families and adults until January 3. Most of the historic sites are open daily except Mondays. All the sites will be closed on Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day and on January 2. Highlights for individual locations are noted below. Times and participant age details for activities vary by day and by location. Holiday season admission prices apply. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/holidays.

Colborne Lodge (11 Colborne Lodge Dr., High Park): Visitors will experience a Victorian Christmas and toast the season with hot mulled cider by the woodstove.​

Fort York National Historic Site (250 Fort York Blvd.):  During special programming from December 27 to 31, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. daily, children can join the cooks in the historic kitchen to help make gingerbread cookies. Signup is in the Museum Store upon arrival for a tour of the fort – included with regular admission to Fort York.

Gibson House Museum (5172 Yonge St.): Visitors to Gibson House will experience the elegant traditions of the Scottish holiday season and learn how the Gibson family celebrated Hogmanay in the 19th century. On December 28 and 29, evening dinner events will celebrate the Scottish traditions of Hogmanay. Pre-registration with payment is required. Gibson House will be closed for maintenance from January 1 to 15.

Mackenzie House (82 Bond St.): Visitors will learn the story of how families celebrated Christmas in 19th-century Toronto. Until December 24, children are invited to write a letter to Santa Claus during their visit and select a card from the 1845 printing press. From December 27 to January 3, children can make a New Year’s Eve noisemaker in the print shop.

Market Gallery (95 Front St. E., second floor): The history and archeology of North America’s longest continually running food market is revealed in a free Market Gallery exhibit that will run to March 18.

Montgomery’s Inn (4709 Dundas St. W.): The weekly farmers market will take a break on December 28, returning January 4. Montgomery’s Inn will be open regular hours offering tours throughout the holiday season.

Scarborough Museum (1007 Brimley Rd.): Weekend visitors can sample hot chocolate and baked holiday goodies. On December 28 to 30 and January 3 to 6, the museum offers camps for children five to 12 years of age. Pre-registration is required online at http://www.toronto.ca/torontofun or by calling 416-338-4FUN (4386).

Spadina Museum (285 Spadina Rd.): Visitors can experience a 1920s holiday season on a guided tour of Spadina Museum. Holly wreaths, evergreen garlands and mistletoe adorn the house. In the re-created 1930s kitchen, visitors can have holiday treats including mulled cider.

Todmorden Mills Heritage Site (67 Pottery Rd.): Visitors can experience two different eras’ Christmas traditions – the 1890s and the 1940s. The public can tour Todmorden Mills’ two historic houses, sample historic recipes and create a take-home craft.

Special events

Two major City events are the annual New Year’s Eve celebration at Nathan Phillips Square, 100 Queen St. W., and Winterlicious 2017 (both highlighted below). The City’s online Festivals and Events Calendar identifies many community events, on toronto.ca at http://bit.ly/2gc2B9B.

New Year’s Eve at Nathan Phillips Square

Toronto will ring in the new year at Nathan Phillips Square on December 31, simultaneously launching a year-long Toronto celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday known as TO Canada with Love. The countdown to 2017 will feature live musical performances, site animations, a skating party sponsored by Tim Hortons and midnight fireworks. New Year’s Eve is presented by the City of Toronto in partnership with the Province of Ontario and the Government of Canada. Details: http://www.toronto.ca/canada150.

Winterlicious culinary event

Advance tickets are now on sale for the culinary event series that will be part of Winterlicious 2017 starting in late January. The culinary series will feature nine one-of-a-kind cooking and dining experiences hosted by some of Toronto’s finest venues and chefs. Details and ticket orders are available at http://www.toronto.ca/winterlicious.

Solid waste pickup

Given the days of the week that Christmas, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day fall on, the three holidays have no impact on the daytime curbside residential collection schedule. All transfer stations and drop-off depots for residential drop-off of garbage, yard waste, recyclables, household hazardous waste and electronics will be closed on Boxing Day (Monday, December 26) and also on Monday, January 2, re-opening for business on Tuesday both weeks.

Depots for household hazardous waste and electronics drop-off will be open regular hours on Saturday, December 31. Only the Bermondsey, Ingram and Scarborough transfer station drop-off depots, which accept residential garbage, yard waste and recycling, will be open regular hours that day.

The City will not book any Toxic Taxi appointments to pick up household hazardous waste from residential properties from December 27 to 30.

Residents can check their collection calendar for residential schedule changes, or consult the chart (a PDF file) for details at http://www.toronto.ca/recycle.

City of Toronto's Holiday Activities and Services

Posted on December 20, 2016

The City of Toronto encourages residents and visitors to take advantage of City programs and attractions offered during the year-end holiday period. Most City of Toronto operations and all municipal offices will be closed on Monday, December 26 and Tuesday, December 27, as well as Monday, January 2. City services that regularly operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week such as 311 Toronto and emergency services will be available. Information about curbside waste collection is provided later in this news release.

City Archives at 255 Spadina Rd., normally open on Saturday, will be closed on December 24 and 31 (Saturdays), as well as on the dates noted above for municipal offices in general.

Winter outdoor activities: Winter has arrived at Toronto’s parks, community centres and natural environments. More information about winter activities is available at http://www.toronto.ca/winter (“Welcome TO Winter Toronto”).

Fitness, camps and recreation programs: The City offers fitness classes, weight rooms, camps and more, offering something for everyone. Community recreation centres will be open until 4 p.m. on December 24 and 31 (later for those with scheduled permits) and closed on December 25 and 26 and January 1. Some facilities may be closed during the holiday period for annual maintenance. More information and schedules are available at http://www.toronto.ca/rec or by calling 311.

Swimming: Drop-in swim programs at pools across the city make it convenient to “make a splash” this holiday season. Schedules vary by location and are available at http://www.toronto.ca/swim.

Skating: The City offers a variety of free, leisure ice-skating programs for all ages and abilities at indoor arenas and outdoor rinks. Outdoor rinks that are open may be unsupervised. Indoor arenas will be closed on December 25 and 26 and January 1. Schedules vary by location. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/skate.

Skiing/snowboarding: The City operates two ski/snowboard centres. Earl Bales Ski and Snowboard Centre will be closed on December 25. Centennial Park Ski and Snowboard Centre has not yet opened for the season. For updates and schedules: http://www.toronto.ca/ski.

Riverdale Farm: The City’s Riverdale Farm is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/parks/featured-parks or by calling 416-392-6794.

High Park Zoo: The High Park Zoo is home to domestic and exotic animals, including Toronto’s famous capybaras Bonnie and Clyde, and is open daily from dawn to dusk. Admission to the zoo is free. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/parks/zoo/.

Flower shows: Christmas flower shows at the City’s Allan Gardens and Centennial Park conservatories are a tradition during the holiday season. The flower shows are open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. until January 8 and admission is free. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/conservatories/.

Playground at Flemingdon Park: Playground Paradise at the Flemingdon Park Community Centre offers fun for children ages 12 years and younger. The fee is $2.50 per child for two hours. Holiday hours are available at http://bit.ly/1aZjJ4T or by calling 416-395-6014. The regular schedule resumes on January 7.

Toronto Zoo

The Toronto Zoo will be open throughout the holiday period except on December 25. More information is available at http://www.torontozoo.com/.

Historic Sites 

Eight of the City’s historic sites are offering holiday-themed events and tours for families and adults until January 3. Most of the historic sites are open daily except Mondays. All the sites will be closed on Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day and on January 2. Highlights for individual locations are noted below. Times and participant age details for activities vary by day and by location. Holiday season admission prices apply. More information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/holidays.

Colborne Lodge (11 Colborne Lodge Dr., High Park): Visitors will experience a Victorian Christmas and toast the season with hot mulled cider by the woodstove.​

Fort York National Historic Site (250 Fort York Blvd.):  During special programming from December 27 to 31, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. daily, children can join the cooks in the historic kitchen to help make gingerbread cookies. Signup is in the Museum Store upon arrival for a tour of the fort – included with regular admission to Fort York.

Gibson House Museum (5172 Yonge St.): Visitors to Gibson House will experience the elegant traditions of the Scottish holiday season and learn how the Gibson family celebrated Hogmanay in the 19th century. On December 28 and 29, evening dinner events will celebrate the Scottish traditions of Hogmanay. Pre-registration with payment is required. Gibson House will be closed for maintenance from January 1 to 15.

Mackenzie House (82 Bond St.): Visitors will learn the story of how families celebrated Christmas in 19th-century Toronto. Until December 24, children are invited to write a letter to Santa Claus during their visit and select a card from the 1845 printing press. From December 27 to January 3, children can make a New Year’s Eve noisemaker in the print shop.

Market Gallery (95 Front St. E., second floor): The history and archeology of North America’s longest continually running food market is revealed in a free Market Gallery exhibit that will run to March 18.

Montgomery’s Inn (4709 Dundas St. W.): The weekly farmers market will take a break on December 28, returning January 4. Montgomery’s Inn will be open regular hours offering tours throughout the holiday season.

Scarborough Museum (1007 Brimley Rd.): Weekend visitors can sample hot chocolate and baked holiday goodies. On December 28 to 30 and January 3 to 6, the museum offers camps for children five to 12 years of age. Pre-registration is required online at http://www.toronto.ca/torontofun or by calling 416-338-4FUN (4386).

Spadina Museum (285 Spadina Rd.): Visitors can experience a 1920s holiday season on a guided tour of Spadina Museum. Holly wreaths, evergreen garlands and mistletoe adorn the house. In the re-created 1930s kitchen, visitors can have holiday treats including mulled cider.

Todmorden Mills Heritage Site (67 Pottery Rd.): Visitors can experience two different eras’ Christmas traditions – the 1890s and the 1940s. The public can tour Todmorden Mills’ two historic houses, sample historic recipes and create a take-home craft.

Special events

Two major City events are the annual New Year’s Eve celebration at Nathan Phillips Square, 100 Queen St. W., and Winterlicious 2017 (both highlighted below). The City’s online Festivals and Events Calendar identifies many community events, on toronto.ca at http://bit.ly/2gc2B9B.

New Year’s Eve at Nathan Phillips Square

Toronto will ring in the new year at Nathan Phillips Square on December 31, simultaneously launching a year-long Toronto celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday known as TO Canada with Love. The countdown to 2017 will feature live musical performances, site animations, a skating party sponsored by Tim Hortons and midnight fireworks. New Year’s Eve is presented by the City of Toronto in partnership with the Province of Ontario and the Government of Canada. Details: http://www.toronto.ca/canada150.

Winterlicious culinary event

Advance tickets are now on sale for the culinary event series that will be part of Winterlicious 2017 starting in late January. The culinary series will feature nine one-of-a-kind cooking and dining experiences hosted by some of Toronto’s finest venues and chefs. Details and ticket orders are available at http://www.toronto.ca/winterlicious.

Solid waste pickup

Given the days of the week that Christmas, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day fall on, the three holidays have no impact on the daytime curbside residential collection schedule. All transfer stations and drop-off depots for residential drop-off of garbage, yard waste, recyclables, household hazardous waste and electronics will be closed on Boxing Day (Monday, December 26) and also on Monday, January 2, re-opening for business on Tuesday both weeks.

Depots for household hazardous waste and electronics drop-off will be open regular hours on Saturday, December 31. Only the Bermondsey, Ingram and Scarborough transfer station drop-off depots, which accept residential garbage, yard waste and recycling, will be open regular hours that day.

The City will not book any Toxic Taxi appointments to pick up household hazardous waste from residential properties from December 27 to 30.

Residents can check their collection calendar for residential schedule changes, or consult the chart (a PDF file) for details at http://www.toronto.ca/recycle.

2017 Community Budget Meeting

Posted on December 14, 2016

Hello Friends,

To help promote understanding and transparency about the City of Toronto’s 2017 Budget process I will be holding a public meeting in the new year to discuss revenue tools and the 2017 budget. This will be a joint meeting between Ward 13 Councillor Sarah Doucette and myself, but is open to anyone interested.

January 26th, 2017, 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Bishop Marrocco/Thomas Merton School
1515 Bloor St W, 3rd Floor Staff Room

What follows is a release from the City regarding budgeting.

The City of Toronto’s 2017 preliminary operating and capital budgets were presented at the Budget Committee meeting today, and members of the public are encouraged to learn more about the budget process and the 2017 preliminary budgets. A range of tools and resources are available, from high level summary documents, infographics and learning brochures to briefing notes, presentations and detailed budget notes, at http://www.toronto.ca/budget2017.

“The City’s budget is extremely complex and understanding it can be a challenge,” said Councillor Gary Crawford (Ward 36 Scarborough Southwest), Chair of the Budget Committee. “We are continuously working to make information about the City’s budget transparent, easier to understand and accessible to residents and businesses. Understanding the budget is the first step for residents and businesses to get involved.”

The City’s budget website is the gateway to key tools and resources that are available, including:

The Preliminary Budget Overview – provides an executive summary of the 2017 preliminary operating and capital budgets, key challenges and a snapshot of where the money in the City budget comes from, where it goes and how the budget process will unfold over the next few months.

Budget notes – provide the in-depth, detailed information about Council-approved service levels, service deliverables, key issues and priorities, 2017 budget highlights and plan, by each program area.

Budget Basics brochures – cover the fundamentals of the City budget process. Topics include Understanding the Toronto City Budget, Rate Based Budgets and How to get Involved in the Budget Process.

Infographics and financial charts – a series of infographics that depict key facts about City services are on display in the City Hall rotunda, available on the website, and through the City’s social channels. A series of financial charts provide an at-a-glance visual of key issues, where the money comes from to support the City’s budget, where that money goes, and how tax dollars work for residents.

Budget videos – the YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/user/thecityoftoronto provides a series of short videos that discuss how to get involved, identify budget priorities, and explain how tax dollars were put to work in 2016.

Presentations and briefing notes — Staff presentations and briefing notes are provided to Budget Committee and Council throughout the budget process.  These documents can help the public understand key issues and follow the development of the budget as it is reviewed, debated, modified, and approved by Budget Committee, Executive Committee, and ultimately City Council.

The City of Toronto’s Budget Committee will hear presentations from the public on the preliminary 2017 tax supported budgets in January. Members of the public can make a presentation at one of the budget subcommittee meetings on January 5, 9 or 10 at locations across the city. More information about the subcommittee meetings is available at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis.

Members of the public are encouraged to join the conversation or follow along on Twitter @TorontoComms and Instagram @CityofTO using the hashtag #TOBudget.

Residents are also reminded that consultations about the development of the City’s Long-Term Financial Plan are underway. The City of Toronto is hosting four public consultation meetings from December 5 to 8, in addition to offering an online survey available from December 5 to 23 to gather the public’s input on how the City can manage expenses, raise revenue and optimize its assets. The consultations and survey are part of the development of the City’s Long-Term Financial Plan (LTFP). To register to attend a meeting or webcast, complete an online survey or learn more, visit http://www.InvestinginTO.ca.

Happy Holidays,
Gord

The Road Safety Plan and Residential Street Speed Changes

Posted on December 1, 2016

The Road Safety Plan

Earlier this year Council unanimously endorsed a five-year Road Safety Plan with the goal of reducing the number of road fatalities and serious injuries to zero. A report noted the recent trend of more traffic-related fatalities involving pedestrians, cyclists, and older adults. Among motions adopted as part of this agenda item is a proposal to ask the Ministry of Transportation to consider re-introducing automated speed enforcement and a proposal for improving safety for pedestrians and cyclists by creating zones with reduced speed limits, improved pavement markings, and signal-timing adjustments.

Ward 14 roads that have been reduced from 50km/h to 40km/h include:

Bloor Street West, between Keele Street and Yonge Street

Dundas Street West, between Humberside Avenue and Yonge Street

Queen Street West, between Roncesvalles Avenue and Yonge Street.

A link to all the roads that will be lowered could be found here: http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-94204.pdf

The report to the Road Safety Plan could be found here: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2016.PW14.1

Transportation Staff have been asked to look into whether Parkside Drive could receive the same treatment.

30 KM sign installations on residential streets complete

Toronto and East York Community Council has approved reducing the speed limit on all local roads to 30 km/h. The changes to Ward 14 speed limit signs should begin by fall 2016. This is a great first step forward in creating safer streets for our neighbourhoods. More information on the reduction to 30km/h is available at http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2015/te/bgrd/backgroundfile-81204.pdf

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