Services for Seniors

Posted on January 7, 2020

City of Toronto offers various resources to meet the needs of the growing population of seniors and older adults living in Toronto. Seniors over the age of 65 or residents with a physical disability can register for sidewalk snow removal program.

The City’s FUN GUIDE for Older Adults provides information on recreation programs available in the City. In our Ward, programs are available at Annette CRC, Masaryk-Cowan CRC and Swansea CRC.

In 2019, City of Toronto launched the HomeShare Program which matches adults 55 and over wishing to share a spare room in their home with university and college students seeking affordable housing.

The City also offers Low-Income Seniors and Low-Income Persons Living with a Disability a Property Tax and Water Relief Program.

Find a complete list of seniors’ services on the City’s website .

The digital copy of the Safe Seniors Calendar is available online.

Council Highlights – December 17 & 18, 2019

Posted on December 19, 2019

Council Highlights

Toronto City Council meeting of December 17 and 18, 2019

Council Highlights is an informal summary of selected actions taken by Toronto City Council at its business meetings. The formal documentation for this latest meeting is available at http://www.toronto.ca/council.

Funding for city-building efforts

Council approved an extension to the City Building Fund, agreeing to invest an additional $6.6 billion to improve Toronto’s transit system and build affordable housing. The funds will be raised by an increased levy dedicated to investments in major transit and housing initiatives. The City Building Fund was first approved by City Council as part of the 2016 budget. This updated levy will cost the average Toronto household about $45 a year as part of municipal property tax bills over the next six years.

Action plan to address housing needs

Council approved the HousingTO action plan created to address Toronto’s housing needs over the next 10 years. The plan will assist almost 350,000 Toronto households, covering the full range of housing, including support for homeless people, social housing, affordable rental housing and long-term care. Implementation of the full 10-year plan, estimated to cost $23.4 billion, relies on new investments from all three orders of government. The City is committed to funding $8.5 billion of that total.

Rate-supported budgets for 2020

The City’s rate-supported budgets for Solid Waste Management Services, Toronto Water and the Toronto Parking Authority received Council’s approval. The operating and capital budgets will maintain and improve current service levels and make investments for the future of those three operations.

Innovation in long-term care

Council approved a new approach for providing care to residents of City-operated long-term care homes, with the focus on an emotion-centred approach that still maintains clinical excellence. The overall intention is to improve outcomes for the residents and their families. The strategy to implement this new approach includes a 12-month pilot project at Lakeshore Lodge before implementation at all 10 City-run long-term care homes.

Ontario’s disability support program

Council supported a member motion to ask the Ontario government to reverse its announced cut to social support funding and to urge the government to maintain the current definition of disability for Ontario Disability Support Program. Council will also ask the province to continue to increase social assistance rates and engage with people living with disabilities, taking their lived experience into account when designing social assistance programs.

Public art strategy  

Council adopted a public art strategy for the City covering the next 10 years to promote new and innovative approaches to the creation of public art, connect artists and communities, and display public art in every Toronto neighbourhood. The strategy includes 21 actions to advance public art and heighten the impact of the City’s public art programs for the benefit of residents and visitors.

LGBTQ2S+ advisory body for City Council 

Council approved the establishment of, and terms of reference for, a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Council advisory body. The advisory body will provide a dedicated mechanism to represent LGBTQ2S+ residents’ interests and concerns, informing City Council’s decision-making during the current 2018-2022 term of Council. Since 2010, there has been no designated Council body speaking for Toronto’s LGBTQ2S+ communities.

Formal remembrance of the Holocaust

A member motion supported by Council will result in the declaration of January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day in Toronto. The United Nations designated that date to honour the victims of the Holocaust. Toronto is home to many Holocaust survivors and/or their families. Marking the day in Toronto is also an opportunity to create greater public awareness of this terrible period in history, when more than six million innocent Jewish men, women and children were systematically murdered by the Nazi regime and its collaborators from 1933 to 1945.

Relocation of Etobicoke Civic Centre

Council authorized proceeding with phase three of a process to replace the outdated Etobicoke Civic Centre with a new complex on a site known as the Westwood Theatre Lands. Phase three of this capital project includes detailed design and tendering for construction. The project will result in new civic and community infrastructure in Etobicoke, including a recreation centre, library, childcare facility and public square.

Bars, restaurants and nightclubs

Council voted to ask the provincial government to review legislation enabling the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario to revoke the liquor licences of problematic establishments serving alcohol in Toronto, including those with a history of repeated criminal activity in connection with the premises. Council’s action comes in the context of work that City divisions are undertaking, which aims to balance support for the growth of Toronto’s nighttime economy with the need to ensure public safety, address nuisance issues and respond to problematic establishments.

Construction in downtown Yonge Street area

Council adopted a member motion calling for the creation of a working group with broad representation to address efforts to co-ordinate development and infrastructure work in the area bounded by Bay, Mutual, College/Carlton and Queen streets. The area is experiencing an unprecedented amount of growth, with 26 projects now active or about to begin, many of them requiring the replacement of aging infrastructure. The motion says these projects require co-ordination to ensure the safety of pedestrians and minimize impacts on vehicle traffic.

Development pressures in midtown Toronto

A member motion concerning the Yonge and Eglinton area, adopted by Council, requests a report on the impact of new development pressures and intensification on subway capacity at Eglinton Station, pedestrian safety, road capacity and traffic congestion. The motion notes that the higher density now allowed in the area is largely the result of new provincial planning legislation and policies, and the Ontario government’s “rejection of most of the City’s Midtown in Focus plan.”

Revitalizing the Dundas-Sherbourne area

Council adopted a series of recommendations for creating a comprehensive neighbourhood revitalization plan for the Dundas Street East and Sherbourne Street area of east downtown Toronto. This undertaking includes addressing issues that require collaboration among social-service sectors and across governments, such as affordable and supportive housing, crisis intervention, services for community members who have very low incomes or are homeless, and actions to address public safety concerns in the area.

Live streaming of meetings at City Hall

A member motion supported by Council requests a report on the viability of making live streaming of board meetings held in Committee Rooms 1 and 2 at City Hall routine. At present, Council and committee meetings are live streamed (broadcast in real time via the internet) but many other meetings are not streamed. The motion says all important meetings in Committee Rooms 1 and 2 could be live streamed with little extra cost, as the equipment and process are already in place. Doing so would “enhance openness, accountability and transparency in the City’s governance process.”

 

Council Highlights – October 29-30th, 2019

Posted on October 31, 2019

Council Highlights

Toronto City Council meeting of October 29 and 30, 2019                           

Council Highlights is an informal summary of selected actions taken by Toronto City Council at its business meetings. The complete, formal documentation for this latest meeting is available at http://www.toronto.ca/council.

Transit/transportation

Public transit projects   

After extensive discussion, Council voted in favour of the City negotiating agreements with the Ontario government on four public transit projects for Toronto. City and TTC staff will work with their provincial counterparts to advance plans for the Ontario Line, the Line 2 East Extension, the Yonge Subway Extension and the Eglinton West LRT. Council supported numerous motions and recommendations as part of this agenda item. Under the City/Ontario partnership, the City retains ownership of Toronto’s existing subway network and the TTC retains its responsibilities for transit network operations.

Planning for automated vehicles     

Council approved a plan designed to prepare Toronto for the anticipated use of automated (driverless) vehicles in the near future. A trial project in Scarborough involving an automated shuttle service connecting the West Rouge neighbourhood with nearby Rouge Hill GO Transit station is scheduled to start in late 2020. Toronto’s comprehensive plan for automated vehicles is said to be the first of its kind by a North American city.

Road safety measures   

Recommendations involving speed limits and other measures to enhance pedestrian safety were approved by Council. Steps to be taken include asking the Ontario Ministry of Transportation to consult with the City before considering increasing the speed limits on the portions of the 400 series highways that are in Toronto. A separate motion that was supported will result in a pilot project using new technology available to assist pedestrians in safely crossing streets at busy intersections.

City assets/facilities

Managing the City’s real estate assets     

Council adopted a report called ModernTO that sets out a strategy for the City’s real estate portfolio. The strategy aims to optimize City real estate assets in ways that modernize municipal office space and create efficiencies. A related agenda item that Council adopted calls on CreateTO, the Toronto Community Housing Corporation, the Toronto Parking Authority and the Toronto Transit Commission, to adopt similar policies for their office portfolios.

Investment in parks and recreation facilities  

Council endorsed a strategy for providing parks and recreation facilities across the city over the next 20 years. The strategy, which is based on a commitment to high-quality parks and recreation facilities serving all Toronto residents, provides details for implementing an earlier adopted Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan. Implementing the plan entails investing in community recreation centres, aquatic and ice facilities, sports fields and courts, splash pads and other facilities.

Use of community spaces in City facilities    

Council supported a motion calling on City officials to consult with LGBTQ2S+ stakeholders and to review the City’s policies governing third party use of community spaces in City facilities. Staff are to report to Council early in the new year. A focus involves ensuring that the identification of groups contravening the City’s human rights and anti-harassment/discrimination policy, and the denial or revoking of permits to such groups, are done in a timely manner. Part of the motion addresses the Toronto Public Library Board and its policies on the use of community spaces.

Cyber security  

Council adopted recommendations intended to strengthen security controls in information technology at the City and at City of Toronto agencies and corporations. The related audit report notes that cyberattacks – unauthorized attempts to gain access to a system and confidential data, modify it in some way or delete or render information in the system unusable – are one of the biggest threats facing organizations today.

Process for selecting shelter locations    

A motion concerning shelters, respites and drop-in programs in the east downtown area received Council’s approval. Staff are to provide recommendations to improve public engagement and consultation around locating new shelters, respites and drop-in programs in that area.

Waterfront and island flooding   

Council considered a report on flooding experienced along the waterfront and at Toronto Island Park in 2017 and 2019, and on funding for rehabilitation and repair work to waterfront parks damaged by flooding. Related motions that Council adopted address matters such as financial assistance that the City provides for flooded properties.

Environment and health  

Progress on a low-carbon fleet  

Council adopted a new “green fleet” plan with the goal of moving toward a sustainable, climate-resilient, low-carbon City vehicle fleet. Related objectives include making 45 per cent of the City-owned fleet low-carbon vehicles by 2030. This plan will build on the momentum of the green fleet plan that covered 2014 to 2018 and established the City of Toronto as a Canadian leader in testing and adopting green vehicle technologies and efficient fleet-management practices.

Mental health and addictions  

Council adopted a motion that urges the federal government to invest $900,000 a year to help address Toronto’s mental health and addiction crises. The motion calls on the government to commit to funding parity by investing one dollar on mental health for every dollar spent on physical health. According to the motion, this urgently needed federal investment in Toronto should go toward mental health services and new supportive housing.

Sale of vaping products   

Council supported amending the Toronto Municipal Code to introduce a new licence requirement for vapour (“vaping”) product retailers effective April 1, 2020. The fee structure is the same as for tobacco retailers. The report before Council documented about 80 specialty retailers of vapour products operating in Toronto and many non-specialty retailers such as convenience stores that carry e-cigarette/vaping products. The report also elaborates on related health concerns.

Community support

Child-care in schools   

Council authorized proceeding with the joint approval process for 49 school-based child-care capital projects in co-operation with school boards, as well as up to 20 additional school-based capital projects, subject to provincial funding approval. Council voted to call on the province to reverse its funding formula changes to child care in Ontario and maintain previous levels of funding, and to implement multi-year budgets for child care.

Police presence in Lawrence Heights   

A motion calling on Council to ask the Toronto police to establish a community police office in the Lawrence Heights neighbourhood received Council’s approval. The motion noted that the main police headquarters serving that part of the city is 8.4 kilometres away from Lawrence Heights, and said there is a need for a police office within the community, given the problems of persistent gun violence and other criminal activity in the area.

Culture

Priorities for cultural investment   

A report identifying three strategic priorities to guide the City’s cultural investments over the next five years received Council’s approval. The three priorities involve increasing opportunities for all Torontonians to participate in local cultural activities that reflect the city’s diversity and creativity, maintaining and creating new spaces for the creative sector, and strengthening and increasing the diversity of the cultural workforce.

Changes to cultural grants  

Council approved a proposal to realign the City’s cultural grants program, with the intention of providing more equitable access to funding. Two long-established funding programs (Major Cultural Organizations and Grants to Specialized Collections Museums) will be dismantled as the City introduces two new funding programs in 2020 – called Cultural Festivals and Cultural Access and Development.

Miscellaneous

Appointment of Integrity Commissioner

Council appointed Jonathan Batty as the City’s new Integrity Commissioner, effective November 30. The Integrity Commissioner provides advice, complaint resolution and education to members of City Council and local boards on the application of the City’s codes of conduct, the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act and other bylaws, policies and legislation governing ethical behaviour. Valerie Jepson, the previous Integrity Commissioner, completed her five-year appointment this year.

Support for challenge to Quebec’s Bill 21   

Council adopted a member’s motion calling on Toronto City Council to endorse efforts by several cities to mount a national campaign opposing Quebec’s Bill 21 (“secularism legislation”). Bill 21 prohibits public servants in positions of authority in Quebec from wearing religious symbols. The motion that Council supported also reaffirms Toronto’s commitment to upholding religious freedoms and encourages the federal government to condemn and challenge Quebec’s Bill 21.

Enhancement of University Avenue    

Council supported a proposal for implementing the first phase of an initiative that involves illuminating and animating University Avenue with art installations. A group called the Friends of University Avenue plans for a temporary, illuminated art installation to be located at the intersection of University Avenue and Gerrard Street as the first project. University Avenue, known as the most ceremonial street in downtown Toronto, links the Ontario Legislature at Queen’s Park to Union Station at Front Street.

Councillor Gord Perks at City Council – May 14, 2019

Posted on May 16, 2019

Gord’s comments on the 2019 Provincial Budget:

Details on this Council item available at – http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?


The Right to Adequate Housing

City Council on May 14 and 15, 2019, adopted the following:

1.  City Council request the Director, Affordable Housing Office to consider the presentation from the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Adequate Housing when updating Toronto’s 2009 Housing Charter and the Toronto Housing Opportunities Toronto Action Plan 2010-2020.

2.  City Council request the Director, Affordable Housing Office, as part of the current public consultation process on Toronto’s housing plan, to include a “rights-based approach” to housing in policy areas that fall within the City’s jurisdiction, and report to the Planning and Housing Committee on November 13, 2019 when the new Toronto Housing Plan 2020-2030 is to be considered

Gord’s comments on the Right to Adequate Housing

Details on this Council item available at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2019.PH5.1 

On-street Permit Parking Report coming to Toronto East York Community – April 24, 2019

Posted on April 18, 2019

A report on residential on-street permit parking will be coming to Toronto East York Community Council (TEYCC) on April 24, 2019.  This report provides the results of community consultation and a potential implantation plan for the expansion of residential on-street permit parking.

Please note that the results in the staff report were completed prior to the change in ward boundaries.

At the April 24th TEYCC meeting, Councillor Perks will be requesting that all streets within the boundary of the new Ward 4 be included in ongoing work to implement on-street permit parking on streets that currently do not have permit parking.

The TEYCC item and report can be found here: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2019.TE5.72

Our office will continue to update you on this issue. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

 

 

A message from Councillor Perks

Posted on February 8, 2019

Toronto Council is gearing up to set its budget for the coming year. Last Monday we got a draft proposed budget from City Staff you can find the overview presentation and the background documents here: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewPublishedReport.do?function=getAgendaReport&meetingId=15450

I have begun to work through the hundreds of pages of details to see what the impacts on all of us will be. So far a few things concern me.

As has happened in previous years revenues from property taxes will fall compared to inflation. On top of that revenues from the Land Transfer Tax fell last year and, I believe, will fall again next year. This means we are forced to tighten and reduce the services we provide. Anyone taking public transit (for example) knows why this is a problem.

The budget also contains $79 million in “holes” – assumptions of finding new savings and revenues which cannot be counted. This puts the services we depend on at risk.

Finally, to keep taxes low, the budget predicts falling further behind on our “state of good repair”. That means things like roads, bridges, and public buildings will not get the investments they should to keep them in good repair, creating risks and future costs.

Particularly alarming is a proposal that Toronto Community Housing will see its state of good repair backlog grow by 80% over the next ten years. This is unacceptable.

I will report more as I learn more. Find out how you can get involved here: https://www.toronto.ca/city-government/budget-finances/city-budget/how-to-get-involved-in-the-budget/

Finally, I will host a budget town hall on February 28. I urge you to find time for this. It will help me learn what is important to you, and helps you better understand the choices we are considering at Council.

Residents invited to join discussion about Toronto’s 2019 budget

Posted on February 1, 2019

The City of Toronto’s Budget Committee will hear public presentations on the staff-recommended 2019 budget beginning next week. Members of the public can make a deputation at budget sub-committee meetings on February 7 and 11 at four locations across the city.

Torontonians who want to share their views on the budget are asked to register by emailing buc@toronto.ca or by calling 416-392-4666, indicating the location, date and time when they want to speak. Individuals may make only one presentation at any one of the consultation sessions.

Thursday, February 7:

Scarborough Civic Centre, 150 Borough Dr.

3 to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. onwards

Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.

9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. onwards

Monday, February 11:

Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall

3 to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. onwards

North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge St.

3 to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. onwards

Residents who are not able to attend a presentation have the option of writing to the Budget Committee by email at buc@toronto.ca, fax at 416-392-2980 or mail at 100 Queen St. W., Toronto City Hall, 10th floor, West Tower, Toronto, ON M5H 2N2, marked to “Attention: Budget Committee”.

More information about the 2019 budget and the budget process is available at http://www.toronto.ca/budget.

Notice: If you write or make a presentation to the Budget Committee, the City will collect and use personal information in accordance with applicable laws. Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available. More information about the collection and use of personal information is available at http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/privacy.htm.

Public consultation on Toronto sidewalk cafés and marketing displays – January 31, 2019

Posted on January 23, 2019

Public consultation on Toronto sidewalk cafés and marketing displays

The City of Toronto is hosting a public consultation to obtain input on the Sidewalk Cafés and Marketing Displays Bylaw Review. The review aims to harmonize existing bylaws so that consistent standards are applied across the city.

The public is invited to attend the consultation on Thursday, January 31 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in Committee Room 4 at Toronto City Hall (100 Queen St. W.).

At the consultation, participants will have the opportunity to provide their input on proposed regulations, including updated fees, accessibility issues and new standards for marketing displays and sidewalk cafés (for example, curbside and parklet cafés).

The proposed regulations have been informed by earlier, extensive consultations with the public and stakeholders. Since 2014, input has been collected from more than 30 consultations and public meetings, two online surveys, and an on-site survey that collected information at sidewalk cafés and marketing display locations.

Input obtained from this final consultation will be used to inform the harmonized bylaw that City Council will consider this spring.

More information about the Sidewalk Cafés and Marketing Displays Review is available at https://bit.ly/2WaQc8z.

 

Final e-newsletter

Posted on July 31, 2018

Hello Friends,

I am running as candidate in the upcoming municipal election on October 22, 2018. As per the Office of Integrity Commissioner’s Code of Conduct, starting August 1st, 2018, I will not be able to send out councillor related newsletters or updates.

This is my last councillor e-newsletter.

As usual, my office is here to assist with any concerns or issues you may have. If you have any questions or concerns, please continue to email councillor_perks@toronto.ca or call the office at 416-392-7919. You can also visit my website at gordperks.ca

Gord

 

Update on 6 Noble Street

Posted on July 25, 2018

At the July 2018 Toronto City Council approved directing City Staff to settle the 6 Noble OMB appeal and accept the revised 8-storey building containing 101 units, ground floor non-residential space and two levels of below-grade parking on the lands located at 6 Noble Street.

Although I understand the significance of the Pia Bouman Dance Studio and the positive impact that it has on many lives, the 6 Noble Development revised application did not leave room for the dance studio.

I met with the developer and representatives of the dance school many times to encourage a space within this application for the dance school. Unfortunately no agreement was reached.

There are some community wins in this Staff Report. The applicant has decreased the height of the building from 51 m to 32 m by using 24 Noble as a guide. Additionally, there is a $350,000 financial contribution towards affordable housing within Ward 14.

The full report is available on-line at https://bit.ly/2N2nvq7 .

Gord

 

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