King/Liberty Cycling Link

Posted on February 26, 2010

The City of Toronto has initiated a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Schedule “C”) to determine possible locations for the construction of a pedestrian/cyclist link through the CN/CP railway corridor between Atlantic Avenue and Strachan Avenue, along with a workplan for achieving this pedestrian/cyclist link. A pedestrian/cyclist link would result an enhanced pedestrian and cyclist environment, allowing for improved access between the communities north and south of the CN/CP railway tracks.

The study area is bounded by Queen Street West to the north, CN railway corridor to the south, Strachan Avenue to the east and Atlantic Avenue to the west.

The study team is planning the first Public Open House (see attached notice) for Tuesday, March 9, 2010 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Liberty Market Building, 171 East Liberty Street, Tenant’s Lounge, 2nd Floor. The entrance is off East Liberty Street beside the Bank of Montreal. Members of the public will be invited to drop in to view information displays, provide their comments and speak one on one with project staff.

king-liberty-flyer-final-feb-19-2010.pdf

Reminder: Celebrate the CTC's 1st Anniversary!

Posted on February 26, 2010

Join me and Mayor Miller to celebrate CTC’s 1st Anniversary.

The opportunity to make electric trains a reality in the Georgetown South Corridor is still very much alive.

Come celebrate the first anniversary of the Clean Train Coalition and find out how you can help bend the rails to electrify the Georgetown Corridor!

When: Tuesday, March 2, 2010 at 7 pm

Where: Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar, 1214 Queen Street West, Toronto

Music by Kitgut Stringband, Rob Joy, Michael Johnston & The Gentlemen Collars

Remarks by Mayor David Miller at 8 pm

Reminder: Celebrate the CTC’s 1st Anniversary!

Posted on February 26, 2010

Join me and Mayor Miller to celebrate CTC’s 1st Anniversary.

The opportunity to make electric trains a reality in the Georgetown South Corridor is still very much alive.

Come celebrate the first anniversary of the Clean Train Coalition and find out how you can help bend the rails to electrify the Georgetown Corridor!

When: Tuesday, March 2, 2010 at 7 pm

Where: Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar, 1214 Queen Street West, Toronto

Music by Kitgut Stringband, Rob Joy, Michael Johnston & The Gentlemen Collars

Remarks by Mayor David Miller at 8 pm

City of Toronto reminds residents about its level of snow clearing service

Posted on February 26, 2010

With a sizeable snowfall expected over the next few days, the City of Toronto is reminding residents and businesses about the levels of snow clearing the City provides.

Large snowfalls require a coordinated approach by the City’s staff and contractors to ensure that City streets and sidewalks are safe.

As soon as the snow begins, Transportation Services sends out its fleet of salt trucks to the expressways and the main roads. After this, the salt trucks will then move on to the local roads. If the City receives five centimetres of snow, the plows are sent to the expressways and main roads and plowing will take place for the duration of the storm.

When the snow stops and if the snow accumulation reaches eight centimetres, plows will be sent to the local roads. Normally, local road plowing will be completed between 14 and 16 hours after the storm has ended.

The City will clear snow from sidewalks on local roads where it is mechanically possible to do so after eight centimetres (five centimetres in January and February) of snow has fallen. In the central core of the city, property owners are required to clear their sidewalks of snow 12 hours after a storm has taken place. To learn more about sidewalk snow clearing in Toronto and to view a map of where the service takes place, click on http://www.toronto.ca/transportation/snow.

The City of Toronto’s levels of service for snow clearing meet or exceed those set by the Province of Ontario for municipalities and road authorities. These levels of service were adopted by Toronto City Council in 2009.

Residents who have questions about snow clearing efforts in their area can call 311.

The City has 600 snow plows, 300 sidewalk plows and 200 salt trucks ready to tackle the winter season.

City seeks better road conditions through the introduction of pavement degradation fees

Posted on February 26, 2010

The City of Toronto’s Public Works and Infrastructure Committee will consider a program aimed at recovering repair and rehabilitation costs from companies that cut into the City’s roads to install, maintain or upgrade their facilities underneath the streets.

The introduction of pavement degradation fees at the committee’s March 2 meeting would allow the City to recover the costs of fixing and maintaining roads that have been severely affected by cuts to the roadway. This is based on research that shows the damage caused by cuts to roads requires the City to repair these roads more quickly that would ordinarily be the case.

These utility cuts have resulted in the premature deterioration of our roadways and have forced the City into significant costs to repair our infrastructure. In an average year, utility cuts require a total of between 200,000 – 300,000 square metres of permanent pavement restoration work. To put this in perspective, 250,000 square metres of pavement work is equivalent to reconstructing Yonge Street (four lanes) from Lake Ontario to Steeles Avenue each year.

Currently, the City spends more than $240 million to repair roads each year. In addition, about $70 million is spent on other work including road work in conjunction with watermain and sewer replacement and public realm initiatives. In 2007, the City approved a Personal Vehicle Tax that is being used to offset these costs.

The City currently recovers costs associated with the work to repair cuts which is valued at about $43 million a year. The implementation of pavement degradation fees will result in an average of $4 million for the City to repair portions of roads that have degraded due to the numerous cuts by multiple companies. The money collected from these companies and organizations would go into a reserve fund that would be used for construction, resurfacing and maintenance of the City’s roads.

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